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  • 12/23/00 Steve Bass. With Ric away for the holidays, Doran was joined for the hour today by Steve Bass, Columnist for PCWorld and President of the Pasadena IBM Users' Group. He talked about his experiences with broadband. He also told a bit about his recent experiences with eGroups and why he keeps his list private. He's not too keen on the current phone headsets, but he's superhip to Napster and it's potential. Wanna find out more? Just write him!

    In the news:
    New hard drives may get copyright protection built-in, whether you want it or not - Cable providers are requiring the adoption of the DFAST System by hardware manufacturers, which may threaten time-shifting for personal use - It looks like Aaron Lutes get's suspended for following his teacher's instruction to hack into the school's computer - The Assasination of Bill Gates is just more movie hype - Also, the assasination attempt on Lars is greatly exagerated - But it's true that Mr. Gates has lost more money (well, on paper) than the GDP of Bangladesh - Napster is asked to ban songs from Nazi bands - The French lawsuit against Yahoo may get a hearing in a U.S. court - China says they'll agree to honor copyright law - Wondering why you can't buy a Playstation-2? Maybe it's because Saddam has been buying thousands of them - Sony won't be reaching an agreement with Napster soon - eMusic is going after the myMp3.com - Scientists can release a single photon at a time! - Seti@Home reaches a milestone, so what's next? - Egghead get's hacked and isn't sure how many credit cards are at risk.

  • 12/16/00 Steve Gibson. Are you concerned about what information is leaking out of your computer and onto the Internet? So was Steve Gibson. He wrote LeakTest to find out how well the major personal firewalls can

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  • 10/9/00 Lynda Weinman.

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  • 12/2/00 Bruce Sterling.

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  • 11/25/00 Lauren Weinstein.

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  • 11/18/00 Robin Williams on Design.

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  • 11/11/00 Jeff Carlson/Glenn Fleishman.

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  • 11/4/00 Jon Katz.

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  • 10/28/00 ResFest 2000.

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  • 10/21/00 The Little Audio CD Book.

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  • 10/14/00 Fall Fund Drive.

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  • 10/7/00 Mike Reed of Rio.

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  • 9/30/00 Simon Singh and The Code Book.

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  • 9/23/00 Cindy Cohn of The EFF.

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  • 9/16/00 The Next Twenty Years. Our guest today was Dr. Jean Paul Jacob, who recently spoke at The Next Twenty Years conference.

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  • 8/12/00 Jon Katz. As the Democrats and other descend to Los Angeles this next week, we invited Jon Katz to join us to talk about the relevancy of a political convention in today's media-savvy (and media saturated) society.

    In the news:
    It seems there's a party in town.

  • 8/5/00 Herring on Hollywood. Does Old Media get it? Do record companies, motion picture studios and television networks really understand the power of the Internet to create something new? No, we didn't think so. But how come? What are some of the things that are missing and what will it take to bring them around? Is it even possible or will New Media just become Old Media with different looking commercials? To get a take on these and other questions, we talked today with Robert La Franco, the West Coast writer for Red Herring Magazine. They sponsored last week's Herring on Hollywood conference where lots of smart people and lots of powerful people (not always the same individuals) talked about just these things.

    In the news:
    COPA commission considers restricting an IP range as a "Green Light" District - In the meantime Bennet Hasselton showed the commission how even the best filtering software has a long way to good before they're acceptable - The FBI must respond to EPIC's Freedom of Information request regarding Carnivore by August 16 - Other folks strongly suggest that Carnivore's source code should be opened to the public for review - Email sent from Internet users using cable modems may have greater privacy protection that other users - The Post Office wants to offer everybody an email address - Mafiaboy pleads innocent to over 60 charges in Canada - Kevin Mitnick will speak publicly next month - Nearly all of the state's attorneys general disagree with the FTC's plan for Toysmart - AOL users are facing another credit card scam - The battle over sex.com continues in court - ICANN considers begins to narrow the list of possible new top level domain names - Is eBay a monopoly? Bidder's Edge thinks so and a judge doesn't disagree - Verizon employees may strike tomorrow - The EU anti-trust trial against MS will continue - Sky Dayton will take over as chair of Earthlink - Napster's web page experiences a huge surge in traffic - Universal Music is offering music over the 'net, for a price. Oh, and it's not MP3 - Swapoo doesn't want to be the Napster of computer games - Warner Brothers will stream cartoons to users' PDAs, Sony will start by streaming motion picture trailers - The BBC enters into an agreement with WorldSpace to broadcast in MP3 via satellite

  • 6/24/00 Extra News. A last-minute scheduling change allowed us to catch up on some extra news items this week.

    In the news:
    Happy birthday to Alan Turing - COPA is found likely to be unconstitutional by a federal appeals court - Burger King gives away a CD with thousands of porn sites listed - A web site takes advantage of a NY Times gaffe and posts an uncensored version of a report about the CIA overthrow of the Iran's government in 1953 - The Clinton administration gives in to "Cookiegate" and orders a stop to web tracking of people who search for drug terms - A UN Aide wants to classify web drug crime on the same level as genocide and crimes against humanity - EPIC thinks the new P3P standard should stand for "Pretty Poor Privacy" - Dell to release an MP3 player for the home stereo system - Beatnik lays off a number of employees - A new survey by University of California shows students who listen to online music may be buying more music - MP3Board is the latest to be sued by record companies over pirated music - Napster is said to be in talks, trying to reach an agreement with major labels - The AMPAS will not consider films which premiere online for the Oscar - Wells Fargo Web site removes online referral program which some accuse of being racist - Mattel removes software feature over privacy concerns - British Telecom says it has a patent on hyperlinks - AT&T win an Open Access case in Portland - AOL and Time-Warner shareholders approve merger - Kevin Mitnick will go to court so he can write about magazines which write about computers - Network Solutions is drawing fire for auctioning off unclaimed domain names - Judge Jackson recommends sending the Microsoft case to the Supreme Court - Microsoft has been busy in their vaporware factory again

  • 6/17/00 Wiring Mozambique. What are the challenges in bringing technology to a country like Mozambique? How does one fight the stereotypes so entrenched throughout most of the "First" World? To answer these questions and others, we spoke to Cliff Burger and Clare Sain-Ley-Berry of the Institute for International Cooperation and Development. They have both spent time in Africa recently teaching people how to use computers and how to teach others to use the same.

    In the news:

  • 6/10/00 Filtering. Are filters compatible with freedom of speech? Today we explored this question from two different viewpoints. Our guests were Gordon Ross, President and CEO of NetNanny, makers of filterings software, and Bennett Haselton of Peacefire.org, an organization concerned with freedom of speech for young people.

    In the news:
    Judge Jackson endorses the DOJ's idea of breaking up Microsoft into two different companies - Bill Gates gives some cash to students while he still can - Senator Leiberman wants some .sex - Napster and The Offspring make nice over unauthorized goods - MP3.com reaches an agreement with Warners and BMG - Banner ads at eBay raise the ire of users - The House and Senate seem to agree on the use of digital signatures - California's anti-spam law is found unconstitutional in court - Oops! Al Gore's office coincidentally lost a year's worth of email that Congress was looking for - A Miami judge rules that online critics do not have a right to anonymity - Salon.com is feeling the hurt as it lays off a bunch of employees - Pets.com is ready to finally make some money, now that it's going to sell its sock puppet

  • 6/3/00 Rudy Rucker. Our guest today was science fiction author (and math professor) Rudy Rucker.

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  • 5/27/00 Pamela Samuelson. Our guest to day was Pamela Samuelson, Co-Director of the Berkeley Center for Law and Technology and a guiding force behind the Samuelson Law, Technology and Public Policy Clinic.

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  • 5/20/00 E3 Roundup. Ric and Doran went to E3-2000 and all they got was a dumb T-shirt. But we did have a lot to talk about.

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  • 5/13/00 Neal Stephenson, Pt. 3. As you may suspect, today we aired the concluding part of our interview with writer Neal Stephenson

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  • 5/6/00 Neal Stephenson, Pt. 2. Today we played Part 2 of our interview with Neal Stephenson.

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  • 4/29/00 Neal Stephenson, Pt.1. Today we aired part one of our interview with Neal Stephenson, author of novels such as Zodiac, The Diamond Edge, Snow Crash and his latest, Cryptonomicon. He's also written a number of non-fiction pieces, including a well known essay about his perception of computer interfaces In the Beginning There was the Command Line. Today we talked about his recent presentation at the CFP2000 conference and how the cyber-community may be focusing too narrowly on what they need to be concerned about.

    In the news:
    DOJ recommends the breakup of Microsoft - MP3.com loses big against the RIAA - Kevin Mitnick ordered off the lecture circuit - Judges in Brazil are dispensing "Justice on Wheels" - Now it may be illegal to even link to sites which discuss drugs - Martin Garbus is determined to keep linking to DeCSS legal - 2600 wonders "Is Mafiaboy is for real?" - What's on eBay? Not E-Meters - Feeling sorry for aging rockers who aren't making enough money? Now's you chance to Pay Lars - Limp Bizkit and Cypress Hill are planning a free concert tour for Napster - Dr. Dre threatens to go after Napster users

  • 4/15/00 Phil Agre on Institutional Change. Whether social, government or economic, there are few, if any, institutions that have been left untouched by high technology and the Internet. Both families and Fortune 500 companies now need to adapt to the 'net or face the consequences. Today we spoke with Phil Agre, Associate Professor at UCLA and editor of the Red Rock Eater News Service about these changes and just might mean for us in the future.

    In the news:
    Here's a tip to wanted criminals: Don't hold $12,000,000 parties in Vegas - Jennicam turns 4 - Microsoft turns 25 - Some MS programmers think their Netscape counterparts are "weenies", but the joke leaves some sites exposed - Ralph Reed almost becomes an official MS advocate, but then somebody thought better of it - Is MS going to give away IE source code? Who knows? The story is gone. ...well maybe not totally gone - Metallica sues Napster and some Universities because people are treating their art like a commodity, Napster just wishes they would have called first - Kosmo gets sued for racial bias in D.C. - Beware of adult sites using dialers if you don't want to make hundred dollar phone calls to Chad - Here's a twist: Amazon gets sued for patent infringement - A big international online kids porn ring gets busted - A journalist "researching" child porn loses his appeal in court - MostHateD pleads guilty and faces five years in prison and a quarter million dollar fine

  • 4/8/00 Lessig & Skala To take a look at the fallout from last week's finding in the DOJ vs. Microsoft case, we spoke today to Lawrence Lessig of Harvard Law School. Prof. Lessig, among other things, was the Judge Jackson's Special Master in the case and was able to provide a unique insight into what this finding means and what we have to look forward to from here.

    During the second half of today's program, we were joined by Matthew Skala, one of the people responsible for exposing the inner working of CyberPatrol filtering software. Mattel, which owns the company which makes CyberPatrol, sued Skala and others over the posting of an essay which details what was found. But before the lawsuit went very far, Skala and Eddie Jannsen (who worked with Skala on writing the essay and accompanying software) settled, agreeing to sell their interest for $1. We asked Matthew about his decision to settle as well as why he and Eddie decided to open up the package to begin with. We also asked about the allegations that the software was covered under the GPL and whether that throws a monkeywrench into his settlement. The short version of his answer: No, it doesn't, since Mattel knew what they were getting when they signed.

    In the news:
    Angelina Jolie is Lara Croft - A couple of Mike Tyson's championship belts end up on the 'net - eBay gets a subpoena

  • 4/1/00 Steve Bass on personal firewalls. With the increased popularity of DSL and cable modems, more people have dedicated connections to the Internet. Even folks with "old fashioned" modem access are often staying connected for hours. Indeed, the always on aspect of broadband is one of its biggest selling features.

    But longer connection times also mean an increased likelyhood of somebody trying to break into your computer, perhaps stealing information or somehow just messing things up. Our guest today was the ever-interesting Steve Bass, columnist for PCWorld Magazine and President of the Pasadena IBM Users' Group.

    The first thing he did was suggest that people visit Steve Gibson's site to run with ShieldsUp utility, checking how open their computer is to remote connections. He then talked about some of his favorite utilities for protecting his computer while he's online, such as BlackICE Defender and Norton's new security pack.

    Steve also mentioned the new trend towards Spyware, which can such things as monitor your actions online.

    In the news:

  • 3/25/00 Even More News! An unexpected scheduling problem created the opportunity for us to catch up on some interesting news stories.

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  • 3/18/00 News and Open Phones In addition to extra news coverage today, we opened to phones to ask about the limits of free speech on the 'net. Should sites like DateRape.org and those advocating stalking be allowed, even if they are said be satire, parody or just fantasy? Is the outrage caused by these site oppression of free speech, or simply the discussion that some people say is needed?

    In the news:
    The South by Southwest Conference chooses its winners, cyber and otherwise - Patrick Naughton pleads guilty to crossing state lines for sex with a minor - In response to concern about cyber-sex, Utah will appoint a "Porn-Czar" without prosecutorial powers and no jurisdiction over the Internet or telecommunications - HUD Secretary Cuomo announces a task force to look at hate sites - Mattel and MicroSystems sue the guys who exposed their filtering software - Ex-CIA Chief R. James Woolsey says he had good reasons to spy on Europeans, but their technology stinks - The new RIO player will be RIAA friendly - A new orthodontic monitor isn't a snitch device, but "persuasive technology" - AOL pulls the plug the Gnutella project some of its programmers tried to start - Unfinished celebrity meals and one of Benedict Arnold's cannons showed up on eBay last week, as well as a bunch of 35 cent Quarters - Dodi's dad gets his domain name - Lucasfilms gets some flak for claiming ownership of fan-created art - NSI may face a $1.7 Billion class action lawsuit for not following convention

  • 3/11/00 Peter Black and Informatica 1.0. Looking for that perfect orrery to give as a gift? How about where to find out everything you wanted to know about pencils? Maybe it's something as mundane as just wanting to know about the latest computer products! No problem, Informatica 1.0 is filled with hundreds of pages devoted to interesting things, whether made of paper, plastic or electrons. Our guest today was Peter M. Black, the person responsible for this collection of information about informational things. His company is hoping to augment the book with an online site that will keep the information fresh, even as technologies change.

    In the news:

  • 3/4/00 Lynda Weinman. Nobody has done more to get webmasters to consider the differences between web graphics and "traditional media" graphics than Lynda Weinman. Her numerous books on color, design and graphics are standards for those wanting to learn the correct way to do things. Plus, the Ojai Digital Arts Center which she and her husband founded is routinely filling up its classes for those students wanting to learn in a creative atmosphere. Not one to be content resting on her laurels, Lynda has produced a number of video tutorials, plus a new series of Hands On Training (H.O.T.) books for various tools. Among other things, we talked about the latest upgrades to the popular software packages and the growing integration of Internet tools into these programs.

    In the news:
    Angelina Jolie may play Laura Croft on film - Coolio says he isn't the person responsible for the infamous cyber-attacks last month - Mr. Mitnick goes to Washington - Mr. Clinton goes to California to talk about increasing security at federal web sites - The NBR blames hackers for what turned out to be software incompatibilities - A 20 year old pleads guilty to breaking into a fed site - Surfmonkey accidentally spills a barrel full of email addresses - Doubleclick changes its mind and will not cross-reference personal data with cookie data it has gathered - Intuit fixes a glitch at was unknowingly sending personal data to DoubleClick - A Washington judge says a high school over-reacted when it suspended a model student over his off-school web site - Ralph Nader proposes a new Top Level Domain for companies that suck - Police in Tokyo protect citizens against shoppers queuing up for a new Playstation 2 game console - A couple of students in Indiana are trying to save Napster at schools across the country - A school in Italy bans cell phones for students because the kids were calling their parents about teachers they don't like

  • 2/19/00 Final Cut Pro. Our in-studio guests today were Lisa Brenneis & Ralph Fairweather. Lisa literally wrote the book on this video editing software for the Macintosh. Ralph is one of the people who originally worked on this application. He is now at 2-Pop.com, a site devoted to Final Cut Pro.

    In the news:
    The end of Y2K is this Tuesday - An informal survey looks to find out why some guys play women characters in action games? - Another survey says 60% of young women have had cybersex - The U.N. will research online child porn - Holland, Michigan votes against mandated software filtering in the city's libraries - Yahoo and ADL reach an agreement regarding hate sites - Never mind their politics! The Reverend Bob Crispen has reviewed the HTML at the presidential candidates's web sites - Malicious hackers hit the FBI Web Site, bringing it down for a couple of hours - A 28 year old alleged web vandal faces 10 years in prison for bad timing - The European Union is pretty upset over a report on the use of the Echelon spy system for commercial espionage - Janet Reno isn't supporting the Senate's idea of a single agency to fight cyber-attacks against the government - The Democratic Primary in Arizona gets the okay to use online voting and Election.com may be the biggest winner - The Feds may not post new web site regulations for review before they take affect - Are Russia and China really a new cyberthreat, or is somebody just looking for funding? - The Judge rejects a request for summary judgement in Microsoft's Java trial - The FreePC offer has ended, and everybody gets to keep their computers - Honda is not too fond of Honda.net

  • 2/19/00 Jon Katz on Geeks. What happens when two smart young misfits find that the traits that make them undesirable in their hometown are exactly what is is demand by high-tech companies around the country? That's just what Jon Katz discovered during the course of writing his latest book Geeks, How Two Lost Boys Rode the Internet out of Idaho. In it, Jon explores the true story of Jesse and Eric, who take his suggestions to heart as they struggle to find their place in life. It's also a book about how Jon discovers the nature of the people who "run the world" and how their attitude often terrifies those who don't.

    In the news:
    Microsoft's Windows2000 launch is a big yawn - Gates denies saying MS will release the source code for Windows - Qu'elle surprise! People who use the Internet, spend less time on other things - The big winners from last week's DDoS seem to be (once again) law enforcement, which is asking for increased funding and fewer civil liberties

  • 2/12/00 Create a Store on the Web. What are the things you need to know if you are going to open a business on the Web? What are the some of the common things that are overlooked by new business owners as they decide to put their "good idea" up on the Internet? What are the unknowns that established businesses must face as they move their business online? Our guest today was Ben Sawyer, one of the authors of the new book How to Create a Store on the Web, which hopes to answer these and other questions.

    In the news:

  • 2/5/00 The Computers of Star Trek. One of the beautiful things about the famed Star Trek series is the synergistic relationship it has with real-life science. Indeed, here at the beginning of the 21st Century, we have many scientist who decided to enter the field because of the exploits of Spock, Bones and the oversexed Captain Kirk. These scientist have taken many of the concepts put forward early in the series and made them a reality hundreds of years early. Remember those floppy disks used in the original series? Or the data pads? They don't seem so futuristic today, do they?

    Our guest today was Robert Weinberg, who co-authored (with Lois Gresh) the new book The Computers of Star Trek. In it, they take a critical look at how likely it would be that Data's head would be filled with LEDs or if something like the Holodeck could ever exist, no matter how cool.

    In the news:

  • 1/29/00 Kara Swisher on AOL. How is it that a relatively unsuccessful online enterprise has been developed into the world's largest media company? How is it Steve Case and friends are able to buy Time/Warners, a huge company, instead of the other way around? To get an insight into AOL's past and its future, we spoke today to Kara Swisher, author of the book AOL.com. How Steve Case Beat Bill Gates, Nailed the Netheads, and Made Millions in the War for the Web. By the way, Kara pointed out that it's now Billions.

    In the news:

  • 1/22/00 Lawrence Lessig. One of the myths about the Internet is that it's unregulated. The truth is more likely that it is just regulated differently. Our guest today says that it holds the potential to be the most regulated of all communication channels and that it's important that we, as citizens of Cyberspace, should be taking an active part in determining what these regulations will be. Lawrence Lessig is one of the acknowledged experts when it comes to the law and the Internet. A Professor of Law at Harvard, he is also the special advisor for Judge Thomas Penfield Jackson in the Microsoft vs. DOJ anti-trust trial. His new book, Code and Other Laws of Cyberspace, puts forward his ideas on the inevitable regulation of this new medium.

    In the news:

  • 1/15/00 Simson Garfinkel and Our Database Nation. Do you think you have nothing to hide? Well, who do you want to see your medical records? Or your child's? What about your credit rating (the one you can't see, but others can)? What about your video rentals or magazine subscriptions? Your alcohol or cigarette purchases? The web pages you visit? Your email?What about your fingerprints? Your DNA? Is it okay to sell this information about you? Who can (and does) buy it? What if it's wrong? Who is responsible? What right do you have to even see this data? Never mine being able correct mistakes!

    Our guest today was Simson Garfinkel, journalist and author of the new book Database Nation. The Death of Privacy in the 21st Century. In it he details how the role of identifying systems such as the Social Security Number has expanded during the last century and is likely to do so at an even greater pace in the next. He talks about what's being done with this data as well as the things he thinks need to be done to protect individual privacy in this age of technological revolution.

    In the news:
    AOL announces it is going to buy Time Warner for $168,000,000,000! And some people are a bit concerned it, for any number of reasons, including open access, but AOL is putting on the Big Push in Washington D.C. - It was a big week for Microsoft. There may not be any plans for a breakup (perhaps disappointing some who'd like to see it), but Uncle Bill announces he'll step down as CEO of Microsoft, but will stay on as Chair. His buddy Steve Ballmer will get the vacant office and Mr. Gates will become Chief Software Architect, whatever that is - Salon magazine knows the real reasons BG stepped down. - The U.S. Supremes decide against Microsoft in the long-running temp workers case - MS and Caldera end their court battle, but the settlement is very hush-hush - It still hasn't been released, but Windows 2000 has its first virus - The Supreme Court rules driver's licence information is private - A Washington State judge rules email and chat can be recorded without the participants' permission - It looks like Y2K bit U.S. Spy satellites a lot harder than the military admit - The German Opera had a small Y2K glitch - New Zealand had a bunch of leftover cash after Y2K, so they just shredded it - There are plans to make the Mir Space Station a tourist resort - NBC complains loudly about CBS's use of altered visuals during New Years celebrations in Times Square - The Clinton Administration eases encryption restrictions, but it's not enough according to many - "Maxus" is accused of extorting CD Universe over stolen credit cards and MSNBC shows just how easy it is - It seems GWBush.com has some friends that have some influence - The WWF smacks down cybersquatting - Lucasfilms fights for the planet Tatooine.com - President Clinton wants to give taxpayers 10 bucks for filing their taxes electronically

  • 1/8/00 Mac World Update. Our guest today was Christian Boyce.

    In the news:

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